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Where to Play Golf in the Caribbean: The Grenada Golf & Country Club

by SarahWoods January - last edited January

Grenada may only have only one golf club, but fortunately it’s a decent one: the much-loved Grenada Golf & Country Club near Grand Anse Beach in scenic St. George. Here’s our guide to Grenada's favourite green.

 

Grenada golf | Grenada's Top Green

Grenada Golf & Country Club © Grenada Chamber of Commerce
 

 

Regulars at the Grenada Golf & Country Club boast of tricky dog-legs and mischievous tradewinds while first-timers wax lyrical about the gasp-inducing views of the Caribbean Sea. Everyone, old and new, is aware that snakes are said to lurk in the rough – an incentive to keep errant balls on the fairway, not out of bounds. Away from the heavy rough, there are umpteen lateral hazards protecting the small, elevated, gently tilted greens. Oh, and sometimes a rogue goat – or two. Once you’re there, the strong winds come into play to test even the easiest of shots. Never let it be said that golf in Grenada is dull.

 

Grenada golf | Grenada's Top Green

Golf carts at the Grenada Golf & Country Club © Grenada Chamber of Commerce
 

 

Set inland between Grand Anse and St George, the course boasts an open layout with curvaceous, criss-crossing fairways. Visitors are always welcome, tee-times are easily booked and green fees are inexpensive compared to many Caribbean courses. Choose from a nine-hole round (under $20) or eighteen holes (under $30) from separate tee boxes on a picturesque par-67 design. Good-humoured caddies are a mine of local tourist information and come as part of the deal. Other extras include a well-stocked Pro Shop offering club rental and a slew of golf gear and paraphernalia.

 

Grenada golf | Grenada's Top Green

The curvaceous course © Grenada Chamber of Commerce
 

 

Keen to perfect your swing? Then reserve a slot for some expert one-to-one tuition from the club’s professionals. Sessions are tailored to individual golfers of all levels and abilities and work on the basic swing movement to transform you from one of the millions of people who play golf across the world to a true golfing master!

 

Grenada golf | Grenada's Top Green

Grenada Golf & Country Club © Grenada Chamber of Commerce
 

 

Visiting golfers used to the stuffy rules and hierarchical ethos of the courses back home will find Grenadian golf etiquette oh-so relaxed and easy. Although proper golf attire is expected and golfing etiquette well-regarded, the Grenada Golf & Country Club is everything a chilled-out tropical course should be. Students are just as welcome here as Grenada’s business bigwigs and civic chiefs, meaning the Club House offers a fun crowd of mixed-age folk sipping ice cold Carib beer and swapping tales and jokes. Some are taking advantage of the discounted golf packages offered by many of the local hotels. Transfers and green fees are often included in the deal, so all you have to pay for is the club hire ($15) and the caddy ($15). Few golfing experiences compare to teeing off in warm, year-round golden Grenadian sunshine, serenaded by a myriad of exotic birds – the scenery and avian spectacle certainly help to distract most golfers from the herpetological hazards as they push ahead with their quest for a hole in one.

Grenada golf scenery | Grenada's Top Green

Grenada Golf & Country Club's beautiful scenery © Grenada Chamber of Commerce
 

Virgin Atlantic operates flights to Grenada. Book your flight today.

 

Have you played golf in Grenada? What did you think of the Grenada Golf & Country Club? Share your thoughts with us below.


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About the author: SarahWoods

Sarah Woods

Award-winning travel writer, author & broadcaster Sarah Woods has lived, worked and travelled in The Caribbean since 1995. She has visited resort towns, villages and lesser-known islands where she has learned to cook run-down, sampled bush rum, traded coconuts, studied traditional medicine, climbed volcanoes and ridden horses in the sea. Sarah is currently working on a travel documentary about the history of Caribbean cruises.